Mapping the soil aggregate highway: Reflections from an LTER fellow

Each year the KBS LTER program awards two graduate students with summer research fellowships. Here Michelle Quigley describes the research her 2015 summer fellowship supported. Michelle is a Ph.D. student in Sasha Kravchenko's lab at Michigan State University. When most people think of studying soils in agricultural systems, they picture someone out in a field taking soil samples or surveying crops or in a lab running samples. That is fairly typical for most soil scientists. However, while I do get out in the field, most of my time is spent staring at a computer screen. Carbon is

The ‘not so slow’ days of winter at the KBS LTER

By: Sarah L. Hanks, KBS LTER Outreach Team Many folks tend to think that winter is a time of rest and recuperation for farmers and agricultural researchers and professionals. The KBS LTER team would suggest that this could not be further from the truth. Just because there is snow falling and the ground is frozen does not mean that there is time to relax. After talking with Stacey VanderWulp, LTER Project Manager, and Kevin Kahmark, LTER Research Assistant, I found out just how busy things are around the KBS LTER during these cold months. Hundreds of plant samples are collected, by

Generosity of local farmer creates national impact

Harold and Edythe Marshall’s gift of their 300-acre farm to Michigan State University has been a major boon to understanding the ecology of new biofuel crops, producing research results with national impact by scientists at MSU's Kellogg Biological Station (KBS). Under a unique partnership between the Marshalls and MSU, the farmland east of Hickory Corners in Barry County is enabling scientists from the KBS Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) program and the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) to conduct unique biofuel research with funding from the US Department of Energy

Soil is life – let’s keep it healthy! Reflections from an undergrad researcher

Each summer the KBS LTER supports students to participate in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program, funded by the National Science Foundation. This is part of a larger undergraduate research program at KBS. Alessandra Zuniga, a senior at New Mexico State University, writes about her REU experience working with KBS LTER scientists Christine Sprunger and Brendan O'Neill. Coming from the hot arid deserts of the southwest, I never expected to find myself in the middle of lush green Michigan. I was born and raised in the city of Las Cruces, New Mexico and had the privilege to

Fertilizing to help the planet

This news piece by KBS LTER volunteer and retired journalist Bill Krasean. Researchers at Michigan State University's Kellogg Biological Station (KBS) Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) program have helped develop a way for farmers to reduce crop-related emissions of a greenhouse gas while potentially lowering fertilizer costs, maintaining crop yields, and getting paid to do so. KBS scientists have developed a program to reduce farm-related emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas that also destroys ozone in the stratosphere. Using data collected from Michigan farms,

KBS LTER participates in Carbon, Energy and Climate Conference

Last fall, the KBS LTER had an exciting opportunity to collaborate with the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education, or NCR-SARE, program to address issues related to agriculture and global change. An extensive, 2 ½ day Carbon, Energy and Climate Conference was held on September 26-28, 2012 at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station (KBS). NCR-SARE is organizing a two-year professional development and training initiative around carbon, climate and energy issues, and September’s conference launched the initiative. One-hundred and thirty-three speakers and participants

KBS LTER and Malawi partnership addresses food security

The W.K Kellogg Biological Station Long-term Ecological Research (KBS LTER) program of Michigan State University (MSU) is partnering with the University of Malawi (UNIMA) in southeast Africa on a new project. The goal is to address Malawi’s agricultural development and food security, two pressing domestic policy issues in a country relying heavily on agriculture. The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) cooperated to launch a new funding program; Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER). As a competitive grant